More recently such approaches have fallen out of favour, but the core principles have become part of much conventional development thinking and continue to be influential. This, in turn, can be disaggregated to highlight different sub-components. With our livelihood programme, the Liliane Foundation supports youngsters with disabilities gain a sustainable livelihood, to have access to social protection measures, and to obtain decent work and income. In a Word The sustainable livelihoods approach improves understanding of the livelihoods of the poor. The sustainable livelihood framework is suitable for this study, the reason being that , analyses of livelihoods using this framework are usually done on entire households. The sustainable livelihoods approach is a way of thinking about the objectives, scope, and priorities for development activities. Vulnerability has two facets: an external side of shocks, seasonalities, and critical trends; and an internal side of defenselessness caused by lack of ability and means to cope with these. Documents available: A livelihood is sustainable when it can cope with and recover from stresses and shocks and maintain or enhance its capabilities and assets both now and in the future, while not undermining the natural resource base.' The focus was on the factors that are most relevant to the farmer’s livelihoods and the relationship between these factors. Processes embrace the laws, regulations, policies, operational arrangements, agreements, societal norms, and practices that, in turn, determine the way in which structures operate. [7] These had been found to be too narrow because they focused only on certain aspects or manifestations of poverty, such as low income, or did not consider other vital aspects of poverty such as vulnerability and social exclusion. One has a narrower economic focus on production, employment and household income. What exactly are these „sustainable livelihoods‟ that DFID intends to help create? We conclude this unit by drawing your attention to the sustainable livelihoods (SL) approach to development. SL approaches and frameworks attempting to operationalise these principles received considerable attention from donors (principally DFID) in the last decade of the 20th century, and their explicit use in guiding rural development has since declined. A central notion is that different households have different access livelihood assets, which the sustainable livelihood approach aims to expand. Decisions on livelihood strategies may invoke natural-resource-based activities, nonnatural resource-based and off-farm activities, migration and remittances, pensions and grants, intensification versus diversification, and short-term versus long-term outcomes, some of which may compete. The use of the Asian Development Bank’s name for any purpose other than for attribution, and the use of the Asian Development Bank’s logo, shall be subject to a separate written license agreement between the Asian Development Bank and the user and is not authorized as part of this CC-IGO license. As analysts point out, there are two broad approaches to defining livelihoods. The sustainable livelihoods framework. The concept of sustainable livelihoods is a reference point for a wide range of people involved in different aspects of development policy formulation and planning. pp 21-26 | Sustainable Livelihoods COMO Foundation encourages fresh approaches to closing the income and opportunity gap for women and girls, with a view to strengthening societies as a whole. Note that the link provided above includes additional terms and conditions of the license. The images or other third party material in this chapter are included in the chapter’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. Over 10 million scientific documents at your fingertips. Box: The Sustainable Livelihoods Framework—Strengths and Weaknesses, Seeks to understand changing combinations of modes of livelihood in a dynamic and historical context, Underplays elements of the vulnerability context, such as macroeconomic trends and conflict, Explicitly advocates a creative tension between different levels of analysis and emphasizes the importance of macro- and microlinkages, Assumes that capital assets can be expanded in generalized and incremental fashion, Acknowledges the need to move beyond narrow sectoral perspectives and emphasizes seeing the linkages between sectors, Does not pay enough attention to inequalities of power, Calls for investigation of the relationships between different activities that constitute livelihoods and draws attention to social relations, Underplays the fact that enhancing the livelihoods of one group can undermine those of another. Sustainable livelihood. Appreciative inquiry is a highly inclusive process that maximizes the positive (as opposed to minimizing the negative) in which a community takes responsibility for generating and gathering information and then forms strategies based on the most positive experiences of the past. Processes are important to every aspect of livelihoods. Sustainable livelihood is about meaningful work opportunities for all, especially young people, but also all aspects of what might be called quality of life at work, including for example work satisfaction, work/life balance and fair reward.. A sustainable community provides livelihood opportunities for local people that need them , especially young people. (i) Key definitions The term "Sustainable Livelihood" is used here to refer to a livelihood that can cope with and The sustainable livelihoods approach facilitates the identification of practical priorities for actions that are based on the views and interests of those concerned but they are not a panacea. It helps formulate development activities that are. Sustainable Livelihood Approach There are varied definitions of sustainable livelihoods. Household livelihood security. The sustainable livelihoods approach improves understanding of the livelihoods of the poor. 185.2.4.101. It is based on evolving thinking about the way the poor and vulnerable live their lives and the importance of policies and institutions. Sustainable agriculture conserves land, water, and plant and animal genetic resources, and is environmentally non-degrading, technically appropriate, economically viable and socially acceptable.” Through sustainable agriculture, World Neighbors helps communities develop forms of food production that are economically viable, ecologically sound, socially just and supportive of rural culture. Non-farm livelihood options are pivotal to the sustainable future of mountain people and communities. A livelihood is sustainable when it can cope with and recover from stresses and shocks and maintain or enhance its capabilities and assets both now and in the future, while not undermining the natural resource base.” (DFID, 2000) DFID’s biggest aim is the elimination of poverty in poorer countries. It is based on evolving thinking about the way the poor and vulnerable live their lives and the importance of policies and institutions. This approach is influenced by many of the themes that we have already looked at in this unit, including those of integrated rural development, basic needs, participation and sustainable development. It can help plan development activities and assess the contribution that existing activities have made to sustaining livelihoods. Conducted in partnership with the public and private sectors. A livelihood is sustainable when it can cope with and recover from stresses and shocks, maintain or enhance its capabilities and assets, while not undermining the natural resource base. It represents an important shift away from the focus on project inputs and outputs and the assumed mechanical links between them. The Sustainable Livelihood Program, also known as SLP, is a community-based program, which provides capacity building to improve the program participants’ socio-economic status. It invites them to look at contexts and relationships so that development activities can become more process-oriented. Fig. Some 909 beneficiaries of the Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP) of the Department of Social Welfare and Development received their certificates of completion after finishing a technical vocational skills training course sponsored by the Department in collaboration with Immanuel Global College de Philippines, Inc. (IGCPI), a local technical vocational institution in Cagayan de Oro City. If material is not included in the chapter’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. A livelihood is said to be sustainable when it can cope with and recover from stresses and shocks to maintain or enhance its capabilities and assets both now and in the future. Definition of livelihood from Oxford dictionary is “a means of securing the necessities of life”. The objective of the Sustainable Livelihood Program is to reduce poverty and inequality by generating employment among poor households and by moving highly vulnerable households into sustainable livelihoods and toward economic stability. But its demand has remained largely unmet. The main objective of sustainable livelihood approach is a method of analysing and changing the lives of people experiencing poverty to improve their lives. LAT Livelihood Assessment Tool-kit LB Livelihood Baseline LFS Labour Force Surveys NGO Non-governmental organization OCHA Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs PDNA Post-Disaster Needs Assessment PRA Participatory Rapid Assessment / Appraisal SLF Sustainable Livelihoods Framework SSI Semi-structured Interviewing TL Team Leader Not logged in The vulnerability context includes, ADB (2004) Future solutions now—the tonle sap initiative. Sustainable Livelihood Livelihood can be best defined as the methods and means of making a living in the world. It must also be made appropriate to local circumstances and local priorities. Indeed, it is because the poor lack it that the other types of capital are so important to them. It is based on evolving thinking about the way the poor and vulnerable live their lives and the importance of policies and institutions. This Entry has been submitted. However, measuring livelihood resilience is a difficult task, and practical methods to measure livelihood resilience, as well as analyze and visualize the data are needed. Its existence underlines the need to give choice and opportunities to the poor and build their ability to take advantage of these, and extend safety nets for those who still cannot achieve their livelihood objectives in a competitive environment. SL approaches to development offer frameworks for analysing livelihoods and identifying entry points for development interventions by donors and governments. For example, they can be very helpful in looking at the vulnerability of the poor to climate change and high food prices, at their resilience and ability to adapt, and at ways in which policies can help reduce vulnerability. The sustainable livelihoods approach is a way of thinking about the objectives, scope, and priorities for development activities. Structures are the public and private sector organizations that set and implement policy and legislation; deliver services; and purchase, trade, and perform all manner of other functions that affect livelihoods. The project targets 22 rural communities with an estimated population of 180,000 people. The Department for International Development's sustainable livelihoods approach Beginning with livelihood and food security, our partners support female entrepreneurs and challenge gender norms through non-traditional livelihood options. Sustainable Livelihood In the next five years, WWF Nepal will continue its sustainable livelihoods program that builds on and promotes peoples’ strengths, skills, assets and potential. The sustainable livelihoods approach is a way of thinking about the objectives, scope, and priorities for development activities. However, it makes the connection between people and the overall enabling environment that influences the outcomes of livelihood strategies. Appreciative inquiry—originally developed as a tool for industry to avoid negative approaches to problem solving—extends this constructive outlook. The sustainable livelihoods framework helps to organize the factors that constrain or enhance livelihood opportunities and shows how they relate to one another. A livelihood is sustainable when it can cope with and recover from the stresses and shocks and maintain or enhance its capabilities and assets both now and in the future without undermining the natural resource base (Chambers & Conway). Five key elements of the Although they can, in theory, be applied to work with any stakeholder group, an implicit principle for DFID is that activities should be designed to maximise livelihood benefits for the poor. Most villagers cultivate rice on small scale basis but the quality is low due to poor milling facility. 4.2.1 lists a set of guiding principles adopted by DFID in its support for sustainable livelihoods. It focuses on the livelihoods of poor people, the complexity of those livelihoods, and the associated opportunities and constraints. They enable people to transform one type of asset into another through markets. Financial capital tends to be the least available livelihood asset of the poor. SL approaches have their limitations too, especially in terms of their ability to look at how livelihoods link together at the national or even global level and in identifying sector-wide or economy-wide solutions to poverty. The sustainable livelihoods approach improves understanding of the livelihoods of the poor. The fundamental principles of livelihoods programming are that it is people-centred, multilevel, dynamic, and ultimately aims to achieve sustainable livelihoods4. It organizes the factors that constrain or enhance livelihood opportunities, and shows how they relate. It can help plan development activities and assess the contribution that existing activities have made to sustaining livelihoods. Find out more. © 2020 Springer Nature Switzerland AG. A livelihood comprises the capabilities, assets, and activities required for a means of living. The sustainable livelihoods approach is a way of thinking about the objectives, scope, and priorities for development activities. December, http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/igo/, https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-0983-9_5. livelihood strategies, especially agricultural intensification and migration; • tempered in form and extent by wealth disparities and differential access to entitlements. The livelihood assets, which the poor must often make trade-offs and choices about, comprise: Vulnerability is characterized as insecurity in the well-being of individuals, households, and communities in the face of changes in their external environment. This service is more advanced with JavaScript available, Knowledge Solutions It frees development practitioners from conventional approaches that are often restricted to identifying problems and finding solutions. There is no quick fix for this problem. The opinions expressed in this chapter are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Asian Development Bank, its Board of Directors, or the countries they represent. It compels them to look for multiple entry points and to move beyond a homogenous “community” view and a narrow sectoral perspective. The SL approach has had a considerable influence upon the policies and strategies of a number of development agencies, notably the UK's Department for International Development (DFID), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), and many non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Human capital , e.g., health, nutrition, education, knowledge and skills, capacity to work, capacity to adapt, Social capital, e.g., networks and connections (patronage, neighborhoods, kinship), relations of trust and mutual understanding and support, formal and informal groups, shared values and behaviors, common rules and sanctions, collective representation, mechanisms for participation in decision-making, leadership, Natural capital, e.g., land and produce, water and aquatic resources, trees and forest products, wildlife, wild foods and fibers, biodiversity, environmental services, Physical capital , e.g., infrastructure (transport, roads, vehicles, secure shelter and buildings, water supply and sanitation, energy, communications), tools and technology (tools and equipment for production, seed, fertilizer, pesticides, traditional technology), Financial capital,1 e.g., savings, credit and debt (formal, informal), remittances, pensions, wages, shocks, e.g., conflict, illnesses, floods, storms, droughts, pests, diseases, seasonalities, e.g., prices and employment opportunities, critical trends, e.g., demographic, environmental, economic, governance, and technological trends. A livelihood is sustainable when it can cope with and recover from stresses and shocks and maintain or enhance its capabilities and assets both now and in the future, while not undermining natural resource bases. Sustainable Livelihood Program is a community‐based program which provides capacity building to improve the program participants’ socio‐economic status. Source: Ashley and Carney (1999) p. 4. A sustainable livelihood is defined by the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UN-ESCAP) as having “the ability to cope and recover from unexpected events, while at the same time enhancing current and future capabilities” (UN-ESCAP, 2008). The Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP) is a social program of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) for families and communities. The livelihoods principles and framework form the basis of all livelihoods programming. It is based on evolving thinking about the way the poor and vulnerable live their lives and the importance of policies and institutions. The sustainable livelihoods framework in 3.1.1 is an effort to conceptualise livelihoods in a holistic way, capturing the many complexities of livelihoods, and the constraints and opportunities that they are subjected to. It does not replace other tools, such as participatory development, sector-wide approaches, or integrated rural development. The term reflects a concern with extending the focus of poverty studies beyond the physical manifestations of poverty to include also vulnerability and social exclusion. But the commonly quoted definition is by Chambers and Conway (1992), “A livelihood comprises the capabilities, assets and activities required for a means of living. A wide range of alternative income sources needs to be explored, understood and promoted, including rural enterprise development, collection of medicinal plants and other herbs, tourism, wage labor and remittance work. It is deemed sustainable when it can cope with and recover from stresses and shocks and maintain or enhance its capabilities, assets, and activities both now and in the future, while not undermining the natural resource base. Part of Springer Nature. The concept of Sustainable Livelihood (SL) is an attempt to go beyond the conventional definitions and approaches to poverty eradication. Livelihood strategies and outcomes are not just dependent on access to capital assets or constrained by the vulnerability context; they are also transformed by the environment of structures and processes. A livelihood is sustainable when it enables people to cope with and recover from shocks and stresses (such as natural disasters and economic or social upheavals) and enhance their well-being and that of future generations without undermining the natural environment or resource base. It helps formulate development activities that are. First, it supports microenterprises to become organizationally and economically viable. It brings attention to bear on the inherent potential of people in terms of their skills, social networks, access to physical and financial resources, and ability to influence core institutions. Rice is their staple diet. Livelihood strategies aim to achieve livelihood outcomes. In this paper, I introduce the Household Livelihood Resilience Approach (HLRA), which draws from the sustainable livelihoods approach and it’s five capital assets to measure resilience. Cite as. The DFID defines a sustainable livelihood (SL) based on capabilities, assets (both material and social resources) and activities required for living. It organizes the factors that constrain or enhance livelihood opportunities, and shows how they relate. Sustainable livelihood emerges at the intersection of development and environmental studies to offer a new way to think about work, especially the work of vulnerable populations. Open Access This chapter is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 IGO license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/igo/) which permits any noncommercial use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the Asian Development Bank, provide a link to the Creative Commons license and indicate if changes were made. They have a strong influence on interpersonal relations. (One of the many problems of development is that projects and programs, while favoring some, can disadvantage others.2) Potential livelihood outcomes can include more income, increased well-being, reduced vulnerability, improved food security, more sustainable use of the natural resource base, and recovered human dignity, between which there may again also be conflict. One of the main problems the poor and vulnerable face is that the processes which frame their livelihoods may systematically restrict them unless the government adopts pro-poor policies that, in turn, filter down to legislation and even less formal processes.

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